Category Archives: Street Photography

Within Walking Distance

A life alone on a chain is a sad life indeed.CJT_2534c


 

Within Walking Distance is a series which will highlight what I come across as I venture out into God’s creation. The series challenges me to find inspiration close by, as travel is not always possible. More importantly, through my photography I will become a  witness to His splendor as well as to what we’ve done with it. These photos will represent the environment that God has placed me in – reality rather than grandeur – but instead of illustrating the mundane, I intend to make plain the Creator.

Tong Bok Market at Night

A haven for fresh fish, meat of any other kind, fruits and vegetables, this place is usually hustling and bustling with people day in and day out. Two nights ago around 9:30, however, the place was nearly empty, save for the few people who hadn’t yet closed up shop and a stray cat or three. In my experience, only in Korea can a vendor area like this be left open all night long with nothing but tarps covering goods that will be sold the following day. There seems to be no risk of theft or vandalism in this country. While walking along the empty aisles I came across this woman, who looks to me as though she’s had a long day and is sitting down for a breather. In this line of work, I imagine I would too.CJT_0050cAlthough there are numerous alleyways to enter and exit the market, up at the front entrance this lady remained steadfast at her post. She was one of the few people still open for business at this hour, probably because of the prime location of her stand.CJT_0073cHere is a photo of the busy street just outside of the main entrance to the market. As you can see, this is not a quiet, small-town location. For belongings and goods to remain safe throughout the night in a location like this is beyond my American reasoning. As a last thought, it seems to me, no matter where I go in South Korea, I can always look up and find a red cross, just like the one in the above picture.

Boryeong Mud Festival

My family and friends traveled to Boryeong, South Korea this past weekend to play in the mud, literally.

The Boryeong Mud Festival is an annual festival celebrating the benefits of mud, bringing millions of people to an otherwise small town. Boryeong’s mud is high in Germanium and Bentonite which provide significant benefits to the human body. Time and again the quality of the mud cosmetics have been proven by prominent research institutions, including: Korean Research Institute of Standards and Science, Korean Research Institute of Chemical Technology. In 1998, the festival started as a platform to bring awareness to the public of the quality of Boryeong mud cosmetics. This tiny local festival has come of age and has grown into a world event, easily one of South Korea’s biggest festivals. Every July, the beach from end to end becomes obscured by the sheer number of festival goers.

We decided as a group – with six children in tow – that the best way to experience the festival is to arrive as soon as it opens: 9:30am. Parents should play in the adult area early before the crowds begin to swarm and while the youngsters are still clean. Then, hit the color mud tent and paint yourself rainbow. From there, head to the children’s area where the kids can play in the muck to their heart’s content.

By now the adult crowd (aka, young people old enough to drink but not yet mature enough to have children) is thickening, but no matter, you’ve already slid down the mud slides, hammered your hubby with inflatable mud swords, played soccer and tug of war in mud patties and had your picture taken in the mud jail.

When the kids have had their fill of child friendly slides, jumpy castles and paddle boats all slicked down with Boryeong’s famous mud, simply walk a few paces to the beach where you can “wash” it all off. Consider rounding off your visit with some beach time or by chowing down on the plethora of local food within fingertip’s reach.

If you decide to stay to watch the parade, fireworks or Black Eagles air show, keep in mind that as the day grows long, the throngs of young adults become more rowdy, and the music on the stage becomes less child friendly. We left around 2pm, which was perfect for our group of 10. Enjoy!

A Place to Sit: Paengseong-Eup, South Korea

I took these photos a couple of nights ago while waking down the streets of Paengseong-Eup. This is a small city – more like a town really – where locals sit and chat for hours after the day’s work in the fields. You’ll find simple plastic chairs outside of every convenience store or old couches or arm chairs lined along the sidewalks, just outside of small stores.

In about an hour these resting places will be filled with middle-aged to old (and very tan) men, where they light up their cigarettes, fill their small glasses with Soju (Korean alcohol) and chat with other menfolk about…whatever men talk about.

Within Walking Distance

CJT_4250cA portion of the letter Paul wrote to the people in Thessalonia:

In the name of the Lord Jesus Christ we command you, brothers, to keep away from every brother who is idle and does not live according to the teaching you received from us. For you yourselves know how you ought to follow our example. We were not idle when we were with you, nor did we eat anyone’s food without paying for it. On the contrary, we worked night and day, laboring and toiling so that we would not be a burden to any of you. We did this, not because we do not have the right to such help, but in order to make ourselves a model for you to follow. For even when we were with you, we gave you this rule: “If a man will not work, he shall not eat.” 2 Thessalonians 3:6-10


Within Walking Distance is a series which will highlight what I come across as I venture out into God’s creation. Through my photography, I will become a  witness to His splendor as well as to what we’ve done with it. These photos will represent the environment that God has placed me in – reality rather than grandeur – but instead of illustrating the mundane, I intend to make plain the Creator.

Suwon Fortress with the Korea Observer

Went on a blogger/photographer tour of the Suwon Fortress yesterday. Although I’d been before, I really enjoyed the inside details that this tour gave. And, even though I had to leave the tour early, I still had an opportunity to snap a few photos. Thanks so much to kbloggers, Korea Heritage, The Korea Observer and the ladies of Hama Hama for the opportunity!

 

Gary Sinise and the LT Dan Band

Gary Sinise and the LT Dan Band came to Camp Humphreys, South Korea this past weekend to entertain the troops and their families. They were SO GOOD! Check out the short clip below of the violinist rockin’ that instrument to Devil Went Down to Georgia! Wowzers is he good!